Department of Prosthodontics

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18

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22

Academic Staff

Who works at the Department of Prosthodontics

Department of Prosthodontics has more than 22 academic staff members

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Mr. Mohamed Albashir Mohamed Zeklam

محمد زقلام هو احد اعضاء هيئة التدريس بقسم الاستعاضة الصناعية بكلية طب وجراحة الفم والأسنان. يعمل السيد محمد زقلام بجامعة طرابلس كـمحاضر مساعد منذ 2014-12-01 وله العديد من المنشورات العلمية في مجال تخصصه

Publications

Some of publications in Department of Prosthodontics

Perspective and practice of root caries management: A multicountry study – Part II: A deeper dive into risk factors

Background: The potential of an improved understanding to prevent and treat a complex oral condition such as root caries is important, given its correlation with multiple factors and the uncertainty surrounding the approach/material of choice. Deeper insights into risk factors may improve the quality of treatment and reduce the formation of root surface caries. Aim: The present work aims to gain knowledge about dentists' opinions and experiences on assessing the risk factor related to the development of root caries and to help identify any overlooked factors that may contribute to less efficacious clinical outcomes. Methodology: A questionnaire related to root surface caries was distributed among practicing dentists in nine different countries, namely the United Kingdom, Libya, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Brazil, India, Malaysia, and Iraq. Questionnaire responses were analyzed, and the results were compared among the groups. Results: Dentists around the world ranked the oral hygiene status of patients as the most important factor in the development of root surface caries. Patients with poor oral hygiene, active periodontal disease, reduced salivary flow, and gingival recession are perceived to have a higher risk of developing new root surface caries. There is a greater focus on prevention in the UK and greater levels of untreated dental disease in other countries, especially those recovering from civil wars. Conclusion: This work identified some overlooked factors that may have contributed to the less efficacious clinical outcomes reported in the literature. It is hoped that this deep dive into risk factors coupled with the findings presented in Part I of this study will be used as a basis for a more comprehensive investigation into the management of patients with root surface caries.
Ahmed Amru Mohamed Mhanni(4-2021)
Publisher's website

Perspective and practice of root caries management: a multicountry study – Part I

Every effort needs to be made to better understand the current state of practice and trends relating to root caries management which will be of benefit to dentists universally in the practice of dentistry. Aim: This article presents a multicountry questionnaire survey of the current state of practice in the management of root caries among dentists in nine different countries to get a wider range of opinions and perspectives. Methodology: A questionnaire related to root surface caries was distributed among practicing dentists in nine different countries, namely the United Kingdom, Libya, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Brazil, India, Malaysia, and Iraq. Questionnaire responses were analyzed, and the results were compared among groups. Results: The results showed statistically significant differences among dentists in most questionnaire aspects. Bleeding is the greatest obstacle facing dentists when restoring root surface lesions. Reported survival rates reflect uncertainty about the material and/or approach of choice in the management of root surface caries. Conclusion: This questionnaire survey revealed the current status of management of root surface caries in clinical practice in various countries. Substantial attention is required to bridge the knowledge gap and address the current void of uncertainty as relates to root caries management by providing a common ground for communication between dentists from all around the globe. In all, this work found a degree of consensus at the international level on what appears to work well among the dental practices surveyed and identified several issues with existing approaches that need to be addressed in future studies.
Ahmed Amru Mohamed Mhanni(4-2021)
Publisher's website

Comparison between Unstructured oral examination "UOE" and Objective Structured oral examination "OSOE" in department of fixed prosthodontics/dental faculty university of Tripoli

Aim: the aim of this study was to compare reliability of two different oral exam examinations commonly used alternatively in Dental school of Tripoli university (Objective Structured Oral Exam, and Unstructured Practical Oral exam.).Methodology: The method that has been adapted in this study were clinical and self-structured questioner, and statistically a descriptive and inferential statistical analyses was used, the relative variation,Pearson's correlation test, and "ICC" i.e. Interclass Correlation Coefficient respectively...i.e. quantitative, descriptive correlation study, Result: the inferential statistical analyses yielded a “coefficient of variation” value for R1U and R2U and for R1S and R2S as (28.455, 34.930) and (10.870, 16.028) respectively. Cronbach's alpha reliability was found (0.455) for R1U and R2U raters and (0.951) and was (0.463)R1U and R2U, and for R1S and R2S was significant (P0.001) with value of (0.951 which rated excellent). Bivariate correlation was significant and with value of (0.906test for Structured oral exam, and was not significant with value of (0.054) for unstructured oral. Conclusion: We concluded that the Structured oral exams is more reliable than unstructured oral exam.
Amina Rajab Elsalhin (1-2018)
Publisher's website