Department of Microbiology & Parasitology

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About Department of Microbiology & Parasitology

Facts about Department of Microbiology & Parasitology

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87

Publications

13

Academic Staff

Programs

Master - Parasitology

This program is implemented through the study of academic courses, the number of which is not less than (24) academic units, and that it does not exceed (30) academic units over 3 semesters, in addition to the completion of a specialized scientific research thesis with a number of (6) academic units....

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Master - Microbiology

This program is implemented through the study of academic courses, the number of which is not less than (24) academic units, and that it does not exceed (30) academic units over 3 semesters, in addition to the completion of a specialized scientific research thesis with a number of (6) academic units....

Details

Who works at the Department of Microbiology & Parasitology

Department of Microbiology & Parasitology has more than 13 academic staff members

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Prof.Dr. Salah Mohamed Mohamed Azwai

Salah Azwai is one of the staff members at the department of 9 faculty of 6. He is working as a since 2005-02-13. He teaches several subjects in his major and has several puplications in the field of his interest.

Publications

Some of publications in Department of Microbiology & Parasitology

Occurrence and antibiogram of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolated from dairy products in Libya

Background and Aim: Foodborne illnesses are a serious challenge to human health and the economic sector. For example, salmonellosis remains a burden in developed and developing nations. Rapid and reliable molecular methods to identify Salmonella strains are essential for minimizing human infection. This study aimed to identify Salmonella spp. in raw milk and dairy products using conventional and molecular techniques and to test the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated strains. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-one milk and dairy product samples were randomly collected from different localities in Libya. Samples were examined for the presence of Salmonella by conventional culture techniques, including cultivation in Rappaport-Vassiliadis broth and streaking on xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Identification also used polymerase chain reaction and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. Twenty-four antibiotics were used for the examination of antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella spp. isolates with the agar disk diffusion method (Kirby–Bauer technique). Multi-antibiotic resistance index and antibiotic resistance index (ARI)for Salmonella enterica isolates were calculated. Results: Twenty-one of 131 samples (16%) were positive for Salmonella spp. recovered from 9 (16%), 2 (11%), 4 (22.2%), and 6 (46%) samples of raw cow milk, fermented raw milk, and fresh locally made soft cheeses, Maasora and Ricotta), respectively. Samples of ice cream, milk powder, and infant formula showed no Salmonella spp. contamination. Only 9 of 21 (42.8%) isolates were confirmed as S. enterica by partial sequence 16S rDNA analysis. All isolates were resistant to amoxycillin, bacitracin, penicillin G, lincomycin, vancomycin, clindamycin, and cloxacillin with an ARI of 0.042. In contrast, all tested strains were sensitive to levofloxacin, doxycycline, and ciprofloxacin. In addition, all of the tested isolates (100%) were resistant to more than one antibiotic. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the applicability of molecular techniques, compared with conventional methods, as preferable for the identification of Salmonella in milk and dairy products and thus reduction of milk-borne transmission to the consumers. From the view of public health, isolation and identification of Salmonella multidrug-resistant strains from raw cow's milk and locally prepared dairy products sold in the Libyan markets indicate the need to improve the handling and processing of milk and dairy products to minimize the prevalence of Salmonella, one of the most important foodborne microorganisms that cause food poisoning.
Ibrahim Eldaghayes(5-2022)
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Molecular Identification, Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profile of Cronobacter spp. Cultivated on a Chromogenic Medium in Libya

Background: Cronobacter sakazakii is associated with illness in infants from contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF) and it is frequently recovered from PIF factory environment. Limited information is available on contamination of other food such as dairy and meat products in Libya. Methods and findings: A total of 261 samples of milk, dairy products and coarse ground meat products were collected from different localities in Libya. Samples were examined for Cronobacter spp. with an adapted ISO /DTS 22964 cultural protocol using HiChrome™ Enterobacter sakazakii modified agar coupled with 16S rDNA partial sequencing to identify the organism. The identified isolates were biochemically characterized and tested for their ability to produce yellow pigment. Out of the 261 analyzed samples, only two beef burgers, one fermented milk “Laban”, one she-camel’s milk, two raw cow’s milk, two cereal baby food, one Maassora cheese and one ready to feed baby milk were contaminated with Cronobacter spp. at a total rate of 3.8%. Accuracy of HiChrome Ent. sakazakii modified agar reach 100% as all of blue-green presumptive colonies were confirmed Cronobacter spp. while other colorless, greenish or with blue center colonies which competed growth with Cronobacter spp. were predominantly Escherichia coli followed by Klebsiella spp. and to less extent Pseudomonas luteola, Citrobacter freundii and Acinetobacter baumanii. Moreover, the isolated strains of Cronobacter were resistant to Amoxicillin, Erythromycin, Vancomycin and Streptomycin, and sensitive to Doxycycline, Enrofloxacin and Gentamycin. Conclusion: This study documents for the first time the occurrence of Cronobacter spp. in beef burger, raw cow’s milk, fermented milk “Laban”, she-camel’s milk, Maassora cheese, cereal baby food and ready to feed baby milk sold in Libya, by using conventional methods, biochemical tests and molecular techniques.
Ibrahim Eldaghayes(12-2017)
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Familial Clustering and Re-infection with 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV, SARS-CoV-2) in the Libyan Community

Since its emergence as a major cause of coronavirus pneumonia, SARS-CoV-2 has spread quickly all over the world. The pandemic has affected all aspects of life and continues to spread despite the stringent control measures. Meanwhile, scientists all around the world have been scrambling to ascertain how the virus spreads and find out the effective ways to put this outbreak quickly under control, focusing on both persistent strict domestic interventions and vigilance against exogenous imported cases (1,2). Several cases of family clusters have been reported and evidence of person-to-person transmission has been confirmed. Indicating the importance of early detection and isolation of infected patients (3,4). Hence then special caution is needed for asymptomatic patients particularly for family members.
Daw MA, Ahmed MO, ET AL.(1-2021)
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