Department of Food Hygiene

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About Department of Food Hygiene

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14

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Who works at the Department of Food Hygiene

Department of Food Hygiene has more than 8 academic staff members

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Dr. Miloud Omar Abobaker Asarat

Publications

Some of publications in Department of Food Hygiene

Effect of combining nisin with modified atmosphere packaging on inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat turkey bologna

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of nisin in combination with different types of packaging on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat low-fat turkey bologna. Bologna was inoculated with L. monocytogenes exposed to 1 of 6 treatments: 3 packaging treatments (100% CO2, air, vacuum), each with and without nisin. Bologna was refrigerated and sampled 9 times over 42 d. Nisin reduced initial L. monocytogenes populations by 1.5 to 2 log cycles and 100% CO2 packaging prevented outgrowth throughout 42 d of storage, whereas non-CO2 packaging displayed a 2-log increase in population during storage. Nisin (500 IU/mL) combined with 100% CO2 was effective in reducing Listeria and preventing outgrowth on bologna over 42 d of refrigerated storage.
Hesham Taher Naas(3-2013)
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Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 in milk and dairy products from Libya: Isolation and molecular identification by partial sequencing of 16S rDNA

Aim: The aim of this work was to isolate and molecularly identify enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157 in milk and dairy products in Libya, in addition; to clear the accuracy of cultural and biochemical identification as compared with molecular identification by partial sequencing of 16S rDNA for the existing isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 108 samples of raw milk (cow, she-camel, and goat) and locally made dairy products (fermented cow’s milk, Maasora, Ricotta and ice cream) were collected from some regions (Janzour, Tripoli, Kremiya, Tajoura and Tobruk) in Libya. Samples were subjected to microbiological analysis for isolation of E. coli that was detected by conventional cultural and molecular method using polymerase chain reaction and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. Results: Out of 108 samples, only 27 isolates were found to be EHEC O157 based on their cultural characteristics (Tellurite- Cefixime-Sorbitol MacConkey) that include 3 isolates from cow’s milk (11%), 3 isolates from she-camel’s milk (11%), two isolates from goat’s milk (7.4%) and 7 isolates from fermented raw milk samples (26%), isolates from fresh locally made soft cheeses (Maasora and Ricotta) were 9 (33%) and 3 (11%), respectively, while none of the ice cream samples revealed any growth. However, out of these 27 isolates, only 11 were confirmed to be E. coli by partial sequencing of 16S rDNA and E. coli O157 Latex agglutination test. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that majority of local E. coli isolates were related to E. coli O157:H7 FRIK944 strain. Conclusion: These results can be used for further studies on EHEC O157 as an emerging foodborne pathogen and its role in human infection in Libya.
Hesham Taher Naas(11-2016)
Publisher's website

Bacillus cereus as an Emerging Public Health Concern in Libya: Isolation and Antibiogram from Food of Animal Origin

Background: This study was conducted to investigate the presence of Bacillus cereus in meat, meat products, and some seafood in Libya. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty‑one samples were collected from different geographic localities in Libya. The samples were subjected to microbiological analysis for enumeration and isolation of B. cereus by conventional cultural, biochemical, and molecular identification using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA techniques. Results: Of 131 samples, only 38 (29%) isolates were found to be B. cereus based on their cultural characteristics on Mannitol Egg‑Yolk Polymyxin (MYP) medium that included 30% beef, 38.2% beef products (minced, burger, kabab, and sausage), 31.8% camel meat, and 48% chicken products (burger, sausage, kabab, and liver). However, B. cereus was not detected from mutton and seafood samples. Seventeen isolates were subjected to molecular identification using PCR and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA technique and confirmed to be B. cereus. The confirmed B. cereus strains were tested for their antibiotic sensitivity profiles and showed a high percentage of multiresistance phenotype. Conclusions: The results provide a better understanding of B. cereus isolated from food of animal origin in Libya and suggest that meat and meat products might play an important role in the spreading of B. cereus through the food chain with antimicrobial resistance characteristics.
Hesham Taher Naas(6-2018)
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