Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

More ...

About Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

The Faculty of Veterinary Medicine was established in 1975. It was the first Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Libya. It is one of the citadels of science and knowledge at the University of Tripoli. This scientific institution works around the clock to meet the needs of the community of veterinarians and contributes to supporting the national economy. It values the care for animal health. It maintains increasing animal production, preserving human health and protecting the environment.

Facts about Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

We are proud of what we offer to the world and the community

224

Publications

87

Academic Staff

191

Students

1684

Graduates

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Announcements

2022-10-31
2022-10-06
More Annuncements

Programs

Master in Parasitology
Major Parasitology

This program is implemented through the study of academic courses, the number of which is not less than (24) academic units, and that it does not exceed...

Details
Master in Microbiology
Major Microbiology

This program is implemented through the study of academic courses, the number of which is not less than (24) academic units, and that it does not exceed...

Details
Master of Pharmacology
Major pharmaceutical

This program is implemented through the study of academic courses, the number of which is not less than (24) academic units, and that it does not exceed...

Details

Who works at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine has more than 87 academic staff members

staff photo

Dr. Jamal El Mabrouk Mokhtar Ben Zeglam

جمال المبروك بن زقلام هو احد اعضاء هيئة التدريس بقسم أدوية وسموم وطب شرعي بكلية الطب البيطري. يعمل السيد جمال المبروك بن زقلام بجامعة طرابلس كـاستاذ مساعد منذ 1996-09-01 وله العديد من المنشورات العلمية في مجال تخصصه

Publications

Some of publications in Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Bactericidal Effects of Natural Tenderizing Enzymes on Escherichia Coli and Listeria monocytogenes

The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of proteolytic, meat-tenderizing enzymes (papain and bromelain) against E. coli and L. monocytogenes at three different temperatures (5, 25 and 35°C). Two overnight cultures of E. coli JM109 and L. monocytogenes were separately suspended in 1% peptone water and exposed to a proteolytic enzyme (papain or bromelain) at three different temperatures. Bromelain concentrations (4 mg/ml) and (1 mg/ml) tested at 25°C against E. coli and L. monocytogenes, respectively, were the most effective concentrations tested reducing populations by 3.37 and 5.7 log CFU/ml after 48 h, respectively. Papain levels of (0.0625 mg/ml) and (0.5 mg/ml) were the most effective concentration tested at 25°C against E. coli and L. monocytogenes, respectively, reducing populations by 4.94 and 6.58log CFU/ml after 48h, respectively. Interestingly, the lower papain concentration tested (0.0625 mg/ml) was more effective than the higher concentration (0.5 mg/ml) against E. coli at all three temperatures. As expected, the temperature was directly related to enzyme efficacy against both E. coli and L. monocytogenes.
Hesham Taher Naas(1-2013)
Publisher's website

Cellular and molecular etiology of hepatocyte injury in a murine model of environmentally induced liver abnormality

Exposures to a wide variety of environmental substances are negatively associated with many biological cell systems both in humans and rodents. Trichloroethane (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, is used in large quantities as a dissolvent, metal degreaser, chemical intermediate, and component of consumer products. This increases the likelihood of human exposure to these compounds through dermal, inhalation and oral routes. The present in vivo study was aimed to investigate the possible cellular and molecular etiology of liver abnormality induced by early exposure to TCE using a murine model. The results showed a significant increase in liver weight. Histopathological examination revealed a TCE-induced hepatotoxicity which appeared as heavily congested central vein and blood sinusoids as well as leukocytic infiltration. Mitotic figures and apoptotic changes such as chromatin condensation and nuclear fragments were also identified. Cell death analysis demonstrates hepatocellular apoptosis was evident in the treated mice compared to control. TCE was also found to induce oxidative stress as indicated by an increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation, an oxidative stress marker. There was also a significant decrease in the DNA content of the hepatocytes of the treated groups compared to control. Agarose gel electrophoresis also provided further biochemical evidence of apoptosis by showing internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the liver cells, indicating oxidative stress as the cause of DNA damage. These results suggest the need for a complete risk assessment of any new chemical prior to its arrival into the consumer market. Keywords: Apoptosis, DNA damage, Environmental toxicant, Liver, Oxidative stres
Seham ALAzreg(9-2016)
Publisher's website

Blood profile in normal one humped dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) camel breeds in Libya. Part 2: Effect of breed variation on biochemical and haematological blood profile

Abstract As little is known about the blood profile of camels in libya, this article is the second of a 4-part series describing the biochemical and haematological blood profile in Libyan camels. In Part 1 of these manuscripts, the overall blood biochemical and haematological mean values of camels in Libya were determined, parts 2-4 evaluates the effects of breed, gender and age respectively on these values. Blood samples were collected from three camel breeds, namely, Fakhreya, Sirtaweya and Mahari, and the levels of enzymes, metabolites, electrolytes and haematological indices were measured. The blood of the Sirtaweya breed showed (i) higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), albumin and Phosphorus (Ph), than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), amylase (AMS) and total proteins than the Fakhreya breed and (iii) higher levels of glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, Very Low Density Lipoprotein (VLDL), Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), Calcium (Ca), Packed Cell volume (PCV), Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV) and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) ratio than the Mahari breed. The Fakhreya breed had (i) higher levels of urea, Iron (Fe), Haemoglobin (Hb), Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH) and neutrophils number than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of glucose, A/G, LDL, Ca, PCV, MCV and monocytes number than the Mahari breed and (iii) higher levels of erythrocyte osmotic fragility, MCH and Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) than the Sirtaweya breed. The Mahari breed had (i) higher levels of globulin than the other two breeds, (ii) higher levels of AMS than the Fakhreya breed and (iii) higher levels of erythrocyte osmotic fragility, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), MCHC than the Sirtaweya breed. The tested blood parameters in the three Libyan breeds in this study were affected by breed variations. arabic 28 English 143
Anwar Mustafa Abdalhadi Abdalmula, F. A. Alnagar, Amal Omar Elarif Buker, Fathia mahmoud Mohammad Ashour, I. M. Abograra , Mansur Ennuri Moftah Shmela(10-2018)
Publisher's website

Journals

Journals published by Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Documents you Need

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Video Channel

Watch some videos about the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

See more

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in photos

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Albums